Category: VSCO

THE END: Top 21 VSCO Cam Presets: The Ultimate Round-Up

THE END: Top 21 VSCO Cam Presets: The Ultimate Round-Up

It’s only fitting that my final review of VSCO Cam Presets goes out on the final day of 2015.

Here we are for the final final installment of the VSCO Cam Guide. It’s been a trip, but there’s finally the light at the end of the tunnel. 

Head to the intro to see the complete 10 Part series, and for a more in-depth look at all the presets. 

For this ranking, I entered every preset into a bracket style, single elimination, head to head showdown. I am happy to present the best of the best, the top 21 VSCO Cam presets!

 The head-to-head bracket. 
The head-to-head bracket. 

I divided them into 5 general categories.
Black and White: All the black and white presets.
Extreme: Those that were on the extreme side of the cool or warm scale.
Cool: Cool filters, with blue or purple over tones.
Warm: Warm filters, with yellow or red over tones.
Neutral: Those that balance both cool and warm tones without being too distracting.

I then narrowed it down to the top 3 B&W, top 3 Extreme, and the top 5 of the Cool, Warm, and Neutral presets. This was mostly done by gut reaction and first impressions. Also, these are my personal favorites, but I tried to include a variety of tastes. Consider this my top 21 of the 100+ presets available (at the time of writing). 

Without further adieu, the 21 Best VSCO Cam Presets!

All pictures can be clicked to expand them.


TOP 3 BLACK AND WHITE

03: Simply my favorite black and white. Highlights are there, shadows are dark, and there’s a ton of gray in-between. Classic and perfect and neutral. 

Original Review: Similar to 01 except it has an even higher contrast. I like how it brightens skin and evens complexions. It results in very clean, crisp, images that I find visually and graphically interesting

B3: Similar to 03 and probably inspired by it. Less contrast than 03 so more sublte details remain, like in the clouds, and the edge of the water. 

Original Review: Almost no added exposure, Even more true to tone and color. Rounds out a pack of 3 very basic, and dependable black and white filters. 

B4: I loved how dark and graphic this preset gets. I would never actually use it for this image since so many details are lost, but I love how dramatic it is. 

Original Review: Focus on contrast and saturation. You will lose details in the dark shaded areas, but it creates a striking image. Does retail details in the lighter values though.


TOP 3 EXTREME

P1: I love the ‘far away-ness’. It feels so very Polaroid, which makes sense since it’s the first preset of the Instant Collection. Creamy buttery overtones, and soft blue water. It’s too strong for everything, but definitely has it’s place when recreating a memory.

Original Review: An overall warm filter, the least pure yellow of the 3. Another good sunny day attitude filter. 

P4: Cool filters are by definition kind of sad feeling, and this is the most extreme of the cool filters. That being said, I love the atmosphere around this image. It’s very refreshing and crisp, even if it is a touch somber.

Original Review: This is a very icy blue filter that brightens and washes out a little bit. 

C5: Sunny and warm. Similar to P1, but blues are more green/yellow than blue. Love the positive atmosphere surrounding the picture, and the fact that it seems to perfectly capture a hot summer morning.

Original Review: Very similar in effect to C4, except that it is a very warm filter. Makes pictures comforting and cozy, without the flatness of a traditional “sepia” filter. Would make a great go-to warm filter. It’s a little strong, but not in a bad way.


TOP 5 COOL

Q4: To me, it’s exactly what you want in a cool filter. Crisp whites, skin still looks like skin, and the whole image feels refreshing without being sterile. 

Original Review:  Hmm, not blue, not yellow, but white it seems. Brightens and heavy contrast. Brings out a few details, but so un-humanizing. Love it for landscapes though. Probably cooler than I would go normally, but the flamingos are wonderful soft little blips on the horizon and I love it. 

HB2: Highlight’s pop while the rest of the image plays along nicely. Brings out the details in the darker areas. Relaxing and peaceful. 

Original Review: I found it was good to skintones, retained and enhances colors, and generally brightens. Similar to A6 but has higher contrast. 

J4: A more muted cool filter with a bit of a fade. Creates a distinct sadness and softness to an image. Also has an all over touch of rose that I appreciate in a cool filter. 

Original Review: A saturated, light preset with yellow undertones with saturated blacks. Actually pretty similar to J1 with a higher exposure. 

E6: Similar to J4, in that it’s a muted cool filter, but E6 retains more of the citrus tones in skin. Love the depth of the water and the softness of the sky.

Original Review: Ok wow, a very cool filter. Skin is left visibly blue in light places, so maybe not the best preset for people. But I do love how it makes the flamingos pop in the landscape image. Colors are left with a blue tint, and it results in pretty “mysterious” imagery.

E3: Very very similar to E6, they are from the same family after all. But E3 over-processes skin tones, and that could be a bit harsh. I love the contrast between the deep blue water and the overly-warm skin though. 

Original Review: A cool filter. I love cool filters so much. May be overly cool for some scenarios, and could leave skin a little sickly. But I find that overall its a well rounded blue filter that adds a “far away/overcast” feel to images. 


TOP 5 WARM

S4: I’m just going to say it. THIS is the perfect warm filter. Happy, sunny, bright, not overly saturated, or overly orange. It makes me happy just looking at it. 

Original Review: Washes out and loses some mid-range definition. Probably good for low light outdoor photos. 

Q10: Yay for pink filters! I am having a total obsession with rose hued images right now. And I love how creamy this one is. 

Original Review: So this must be what its like to see through rose colored glasses. Creates a very welcoming image. Similar to Q3 in that it’s easy on the contrast, creating a somewhat flat image. 

Q1: Almost the same at Q10 but without the pink. Color values are almost the same. A nice alternative that doesn’t feel overly processed. 

Original Review: Brightens highlights and mid-tones. Adds a soft golden glow. Creates kind of dreamy landscapes. 

E2: Slightly yellow overtones. Q10, Q1, and E2 could all be the same effects but with different tints. Retains good color depth and variation.

Original Review: A pretty neutral filter. Does add slight, pleasant warmth to skin tones, but leaves landscapes pretty realistic. Nothing too drastic all around, enhances, but minds it own business. Probably the most true to color of all the E series.

P9: Probably should have been on the extreme list, but I like it’s commitment. Creates a distinct atmosphere to the image. Kind of like looking back in a hungover stupor.

Original Review: Another yellow! I really don’t love yellow filters, but for some landscape photography or when people aren’t the subject matter, it adds a very interesting glow and depth to pictures. 


TOP 5 NEUTRAL

LV1: Damn you guys, I would have never thought the most versatile, best all around preset, would be free. The perfect blend of cool and warm, light and dark, saturation and contrast. 

Original Review: A filter that does what you usually do anyway to edit a photo. Tweaks the exposure, contrast, and saturation. Doesn’t really mess with color hue or temperature. 

C8: Does what it sets out to do. The details are there with a full range of color. Makes an image better, and without too much added personality. 

Original Review: Doesn’t do anything to striking. A good brightness and contrast enhancement. Leaves most colors alone, but over-exaggerates the “blue” in blues and greens. Love that it doesn’t leave skin to sterile.  

K3: You know how much I love this filter. I think it does the most perfect things to the blues and adds rosy tints to the highlights. Best of both worlds. 

Original Review: Blues are bluer while still being a deep, warm overall filter. Doesn’t brighten as much as it enhances contrast and depth. It’s pretty much the only filter I use on the shop Instagram because it’s a great “general” enhancer, and adds just enough personality. 

N3: Faded and yellow/green, the brightest of the neutrals. I like how it feels the tiniest bit exaggerated and immersive. 

Original Review: Warm filter. Pleasantly fades and softens skin tones. Enhances color vibrancy and tone.

E1: Similar to K3 but brighter. Slight purple tint, but overall it adapts to the mood of the image. 

Original Review: A pleasant glow on skin-tones. Deepens shadows and makes subjects pop. I personally really love cool landscapes, so this one is a total win in my book. Doesn’t get too crazy with exposure or contrast.


enjoyed the series? wanna say thanks?

PART TEN: The Alchemy Collection

PART TEN: The Alchemy Collection

Well students, here we are, at the end of our journey together.

POP QUIZ! Just kidding. 

Today I bring you the final chapter, part ten of the VSCO Cam series. The latest addition to the VSCO Cam collection, released in April 2015, the Alchemy Collection includes 10 new presets, Q1-10, for $3 from the in-app VSCO Cam store. 

The Alchemy Collection incorporates a wide range of Cross Processed looks. An experimental technique in which films are developed in an alternative chemical solution, Cross Processing often creates dramatic color shifts and high contrast. The Alchemy Collection emulates this technique and features rich vibrancies balanced by refined tones, making this pack ideal for lifestyle photography, stylized portraiture, and strong statement images. – VSCO

And don’t forget to tag your grams with #vscocamwitheli so I can check them out! You could even be featured in the Little Insider Monthly Update!

On to the presets!

 The originals. One for skin tone, landscape, and color. All shot in neutral lighting with a Samsung Galaxy S6.
The originals. One for skin tone, landscape, and color. All shot in neutral lighting with a Samsung Galaxy S6.

Q1: Brightens highlights and mid-tones. Adds a soft golden glow. Creates kind of dreamy landscapes. 

Q2: Similar to Q1, but cranks up the contrast, creating bright highs and dark, deep lows. Image feels very processed. Not a natural look for people, landscapes, or colors. Maybe try with urban photos or street fashion photography. 

Q3: Brightens and increases contrast. Very cool overtones, which leaves people looking cold and distant. Fades out highlights for a flat image. Makes true blues, like the blue jolly ranchers, really pop. Makes landscapes totally weird. Here you really notice the cross processed look VSCO was talking about. Some foliage is very blue, while some is noticeably greener. This preset probably has a time and place, but not for everyday. 

Q4: Hmm, not blue, not yellow, but white it seems. Brightens and heavy contrast. Brings out a few details, but so un-humanizing. Love it for landscapes though. Probably cooler than I would go normally, but the flamingos are wonderful soft little blips on the horizon and I love it. 

Q5: Oh wow! So great for people! Brightens up, and tweaks the contrast, but not too heavy handed. Also pretty neutral in color overtones. Improves the feel of an image, and makes it more welcoming.

Q6: Almost exactly the same as Q4 in exposure and contrast. But has strong yellow-green overtones. It’s kinda like how I imagine split pea soup to look. And I know I’ve had a similar color preset recently. I’ll go dig it up for you to compare. 

Q7: Almost exactly the same as Q5 in exposure and contrast. But had a warm yellow overtone instead of a neutral-rosy tint. 

Q8: I really like the personality of this preset. Feels processed, but not in a totally bad way. Warm tones which enhance the yellows and reds already in an image. Fades out deep shadows so its not overly contrasting.

Q9: High contrast and exposure. Blows out highlights. Very processed feel with deep shadows and very bright highs and mids. Pretty good color retention in the jolly ranchers. 

Q10: So this must be what its like to see through rose colored glasses. Creates a very welcoming image. Similar to Q3 in that it’s easy on the contrast, creating a somewhat flat image. 

OVERALL: More than “a little” out there, the Alchemy Collection accomplishes what it set out to do. A little trippy, a little magical, a lot of processing, but a lot of personality too. 


I’ll be stopping in one more time for the final, top preset roundup! I planned for it to be an ultimate top 10 list, but I changed my mind. I’m going to break it down by use, and give you the top 3 presets for landscapes, for architecture, for selfies, etc. Tweet me your favorites in each category and see if they make the cut! 


I would love to see how you use the Alchemy Collection.
Tag your shots #vscocamwitheli so I can check them out! 

PART NINE: The Chromatic Collection

PART NINE: The Chromatic Collection

Hello there! I’m sad to say our VSCO Cam journey is almost at an end. Boo! It’s been awesome to have these discoveries with all of you! I hope you enjoyed it as much as I have. Anyway, on to the presets! 

Today we cover 6 “new” presets with a ton of character. The Chromatic Collection was a late release to the VSCO Cam party (released December 2014), but are pretty wonderful filters.

The Chromatic Collection embodies the bright and bold look of mid-century analog film. Strong primary colors mix with muted neutral tones, perfect for portraits, environments, and stylized editorial. – VSCO

The Chromatic Collection is available for $2.99 from the VSCO Cam in-app store.

And don’t forget to tag your grams with #vscocamwitheli so I can check them out!

  The original pictures. One for skin tone, landscape, and color. All taken in neutral lighting with the Galaxy S6.
The original pictures. One for skin tone, landscape, and color. All taken in neutral lighting with the Galaxy S6.

C4-C6: Strong done delicately.

C4: Oh how I love cool temperature presets! I would call it an “icy” filter, with how cool, light, and refreshing it is. Enhances mid-tones without blowing out highlights. Has a bit of a fade/fog to it.

C5: Very similar in effect to C4, except that it is a very warm filter. Makes pictures comforting and cozy, without the flatness of a traditional “sepia” filter. Would make a great go-to warm filter. It’s a little strong, but not in a bad way.

C6: Similar to C4, but deeper. Has a higher contrast and range of colors. Creates deep saturated hues, but can leave skin blotchy. I adore how the landscape has both warm and cool foliage! And all the colors pop in the candy shot. A deep, saturated, and versatile preset.

C7-C9: Very delicate enhancements.

C7: An interesting preset. Skin-tones were warmed, but the foliage went cool, with the flamingos becoming orange by contrast. I actually really enjoy it for landscapes and skin-tone. Colors are a bit more saturated and exaggerated. 

C8: Doesn’t do anything to striking. A good brightness and contrast enhancement. Leaves most colors alone, but over-exaggerates the “blue” in blues and greens. Love that it doesn’t leave skin to sterile.  

C9: Similar to C4 but with more yellow and a higher saturation. Colors really pop! Landscapes are cool, but skintone isn’t too blotchy, though I still don’t love it. Try it with urban photography and still-lifes. 

OVERALL: The Chromatic Collection introduces more vintage feel presets, but I don’t mind because the vintage film one are all my favorite. Look to the Essence Collection if you want more. The Chromatic Collection leaves you with saturated blues, warm yellows, and a touch of nostalgia. 

Head back to the Intro to see what other collections I’ve covered.


Alright, who loves the Chromatic Collection?!
Tag your pics #vscocamwitheli so I can check them out!

PART EIGHT: The Legacy Collection

PART EIGHT: The Legacy Collection

Attention VSCO Cam students, class is now in session!

You could say I took the summer off since I missed last month’s review, but this Collection is really worth the wait.

The Legacy Collection is the re-release of the 10 original presets by VSCO. Being the original 10, they cover all your bases, but VSCO has made pretty remarkable progress since developing these. Pro: Its got everything you really need, all in one collection. Con: But you can find better presets else where in their store, but you might have to spend a bit more. 

The Legacy Collection is available for $1.99 from the VSCO Cam in-app store.

And if you use these for your own photos, please tag them #vscocamwitheli so I can check them out! You could even be featured in the Little Insider Monthly Update!

 The original pictures. One for skin tone, landscape, and color. All taken in neutral lighting with the Galaxy S6.
The original pictures. One for skin tone, landscape, and color. All taken in neutral lighting with the Galaxy S6.

01-03: The Original Black and White presets. Versatile and clean. 

01: A pretty adaptable B/W filter. True-ish to tone, with a touch of enhanced contrast. I like how blacks stay saturated and the highlights aren’t blown out. 

02: A lighter, slightly muddy preset. Highlights are pretty true, but you lose a lot of detail in the shadows, which have been faded out. Still, its good for a nice, comfortable fade. 

03: Similar to 01 except it has an even higher contrast. I like how it brightens skin and evens complexions. It results in very clean, crisp, images that I find visually and graphically interesting. 

OVERALL: Good default B/W presets. You could achieve an even greater range of possibilities, if you partner these with the exposure or fade options in the editor. I prefer 03 to the others. 

04-06: I’m calling them the full color versions of 01-03. 

04: Very very neutral. I don’t think it tints images either warm or cool. Seems to just enhance the colors already in an image. I like the improvements to exposure and contrast. A very mild filter that makes pictures nominally better. 

05: Damn. Very close to 04 but with shadows faded out. True to color. Doesn’t get crazy with it. Basically, a color version of 02.

06:  Enhances contrast, but doesn’t get crazy with it. Has a slight yellow tint, but not terribly noticeable. I like how it keeps darks dark, and doesn’t even tough the highlights. Photos retain a lot of their details in the highlights.

OVERALL: Good, basic, presets. They are going to make pretty much every picture better, but doesn’t do anything really remarkable. 

07-10 The real edits.

07: I consider it a neutral preset, color wise. Similar to 03, with pronounced shadows and striking highlights. 07 has high contrast, so its not true to life, with skin-tones becoming blotchy or patchy, but I really don’t mind. Retains most of the medium tones of the original. 

08: Like you looking at a picture after its been washed in green pea soup. Yellow/green undertones so I really don’t love it for skin. I like it for landscapes and color though, oddly enough. Still, compared to a lot of the other presents covered so far, it is very mild. 

09: More of a pure yellow filter. Not too bright, not too dark. It would probably be too much on an image taken indoors under already yellow lighting, but it adds a pleasant “sunniness” to outdoor photos. Leaves most colors pretty creamy too. 

10: Slightly cool filter that over or under exposes mid-tones. People become sterile and cold, but I love the depth it adds to landscape imagery. (If you’ve been following along, you’ve noticed how I looove cool landscapes.)

OVERALL: These start to mess with tint and warmth, and compared to others in the collection they are strong, but compared to other preset collections, they are very mild. The Legacy Collection is a decent, basic, collection for those just getting their feet wet in the VSCO Cam system. 

Head back to the Intro to see what other collections I’ve covered.


Alright students, what do you think? Would you use these, or are you already too deep into the VSCO Cam rabbit hole? Test them and use the tag #vscocamwitheli so I can check them out.

PART SEVEN: The Minimalist Collection

PART SEVEN: The Minimalist Collection

Hello VSCO Cam lovers!

Another month, another preset review. This month we cover the Minimalist Collection. 10 presets you can find in the store for $2.99. 

Right off the bat, I assumed I would looove this set because, hello, its the minimalist series! And we are oh-so minimal around here. And while I could see adding maybe one of these to my rotation, overall I was very much not in love. -sadface- 

But really, it’s a personal preference. This collection, on a whole, is full of cool, far-away, presets that don’t translate well to lively, or overly colorful shots. I would love to see how you can use these for architecture or urban photography. That’s where they really come alive!

And if you use these for your own photos, please tag them #vscocamwitheli so I can check them out! You could even be featured in the Little Insider Monthly Update!

 The New Originals. One for Skin tone, landscape, and color.
The New Originals. One for Skin tone, landscape, and color.

A7-10: Analog/Essential: With hints of blues, desaturated highlights, and understated, muted exposure, the A7, A8, A9, and A10 presets embody analog film. – VSCO Cam

A7: A slightly cool filter that enhances contrast. Don’t love it for skin tones as its pretty sterilizing. I love the change to landscapes, but you already know how much I love cool tone landscapes. 

A8: Even cooler than A7. Not grand for skin tones. A8 has a slightly higher contrast with brighter brights.

A9: Slightly warmer than A8. Still pretty high contrast and not easy on skin tones. But A9 has creamer highlights.

A10: Faded, warm, and almost sepia filter. The only one I would use on skin. But makes landscapes almost “dirty”. Opposite of A9 in all the best ways. Sepia filters are annoying and overused but I don’t find this overwhelming or distracting.

OVERALL: I would use these for landscape shots or urban photography. They create an air of distance and stillness that is perfect for non-living subject material.

J1-6: Premier/Simple: Emphasizing the beauty in stillness, the J presets lend to quiet moments, contemplative settings, portraiture, and architecture. – VSCO Cam

J1: A striking and slightly cool, dark filter. It would be fantastic for moody themes since most of the highlights are retained.

J2: A high contrast, low exposure filter. Blue undertones, but not overdone.

J3: Like the most purple filter that ever filtered. Dark filter with deep, deep, warm undertones. Leaves skin blotchy and almost bruised. This would make a good “everything” filter for the right instagram theme. If you are going for moody but not sad, and have mostly pictures of still-lifes. It could be pretty captivating!

J4: A saturated, light preset with yellow undertones with saturated blacks. Actually pretty similar to J1 with a higher exposure. 

J5: Has both yellow and blue undertones. Not quiet sure how it does it. Also very similar to J2 but with slightly cooler greens. And slightly more exposure. 

J6: A high contrast, almost monochrome yellow filter. Opposite of J3 in every way. It’s a deep yellow, not a bright yellow, and could make for some really interesting architectural shots.

OVERALL: The J Series is full of cool presets, that are really great for still life, or architecture, or urban photography. But similar to A7-10, I  wouldn’t use them for active or lively or colorful shots as they aren’t true to color, and the give off an air of distance and coldness. Look to the J presets to create striking staged photos or to emphasize the little quiet moments. 


So, what do you think? Too cold? Or just what you’ve always wanted? Let me know in the comments, or tweet at me! And tag your own photos #vscocamwitheli so I can see!

Oh and it you are just joining us, head to the intro to get a full preset roundup!

PART SIX: The Essence Collection

PART SIX: The Essence Collection

It’s been a hot minute since I checked in with you photo freaks. So how’s everybody doing?

With this post brings all kinds of updates! We’ve got new original photos, taken with a new camera, and a sexy new post image (the whole series got a face lift).

Today I bring you The Essence Collection. $1.99 in the VSCO Cam store. It includes 8 presets (E1-8) that are reminiscent of classic film.

Essence / Archetype embellishes golden highlights and deep shadows, harkening back to the gilded age of consumer film stock. Unveiling shades of indigo within the shadows to marigold hues revealed in the highlights, E1-E8 are must-have presets to capture the essence of classic film stock. VSCO Cam

I’m going to start by saying, since these presets were all about “classic film” I assumed I was going to hate them, but they are so so fantastic! I’m going to have a hard time picking just one or two to add to my usual collection!

Check out the intro and a breakdown of whats to come. This is not sponsored in any way. I use VSCO Cam for all my mobile photo editing, and I think this resource needed to exist on the internet, so I made it. Simple as that.

Now what you’ve come here for, the photos!

Oh, and don’t forget to use #vscocamwitheli! I absolutely love checking out your edits!

 The new originals! One for skin tone, landscape, and color. 
The new originals! One for skin tone, landscape, and color. 

 

E1-3: A preset for all occasions. 

E1: A pleasant glow on skin-tones. Deepens shadows and makes subjects pop. Just look how “alive” those jolly ranchers are, lol. I personally really love cool landscapes, so this one is a total win in my book. Doesn’t get too crazy with exposure or contrast.

E2: A pretty neutral filter. Does add slight, pleasant warmth to skin tones, but leaves landscapes pretty realistic. Nothing too drastic all around, enhances, but minds it own business. Probably the most true to color of all the E series.

E3: A cool filter. I love cool filters so much. May be overly cool for some scenarios, and could leave skin a little sickly. But I find that overall its a well rounded blue filter that adds a “far away/overcast” feel to images. 

E4-6: A family of blues.

E4: Pretty muted. Deepens shadows, but brightens and almost flattens every other color. Again, its a delicate filter, and it probably doesn’t “ruin” any photo, but I can’t think of a time I would use it over any other preset. 

E5: Very similar to E4 but it de-saturates and fade out the shadows. Images are left kind of misty/foggy. Also more cool in tone.

E6: Ok wow, a very cool filter. Skin is left visibly blue in light places, so maybe not the best preset for people. But I do love how it makes the flamingos pop in the landscape image. Colors are left with a blue tint, and it results in pretty “mysterious” imagery.

E7-8: Buttery soft.

E7: Very similar to E1 in my opinion. Except hightlights aren’t “brighter” as much as they are “creamer”. The trees in the landscape have an overall greater range of highlights, but they are soft and buttery. Colors become richer, but I’m not a huge fan of what it does to skin.

E8: A cool filter. Like if E6 and E7 had a love child. Similar to E6 in the strong blue overtones, but like E7, the highlights are soft and buttery. Leaves images cold, but approachable and wishfull. 

OVERALL: The E series is full of great, enhancing, presets. Any one of these could easily become your signature filter. All work well with a variety of subject matters, lighting conditions, and overall color. 


I started the tag #vscocamwitheli.
So tag your edits with it because I want to check them out!
I absolutely LOVE seeing what you’ve been photographing!


Next time, I’ll be covering the Minimalist Collection. It can be found in the VSCO Cam in-app store and includes 10 new presets!

Head back to the intro and see what you’ve missed!

PART FIVE: The Contemporary Collection

PART FIVE: The Contemporary Collection

Welcome  VSCO Cam lovers!

I know you’ve been eagerly awaiting the next entry in the VSCO Cam Preset series! And honestly, this breakdown/review/guide/whatever is my favorite monthly thing to work on. It’s been helping me pick my top filters, but also gives me a boost of inspiration when I revisit presets I had forgotten about. 

Today we cover VSCO Cam’s Contemporary Collection. It can be downloaded from the VSCO Cam app store for $2.99 and it includes 12 presets (A1-3, H1-6, N1-3), and some pretty nice “signature” filters.

Check out the intro and a breakdown of whats to come. This is not sponsored in any way. I use VSCO Cam for all my mobile photo editing, and I think this resource needed to exist on the internet, so I made it. Simple as that.

Now what you’ve come here for, the photos!

Don’t forget, I made the tag #vscocamwitheli! I loooove seeing what you’ve made!

  THE ORIGINAL IMAGES. ONE FOR SKIN TONE, LANDSCAPES, AND COLOR. ALL TAKEN OUTSIDE WITH MY SAMSUNG GS3.
THE ORIGINAL IMAGES. ONE FOR SKIN TONE, LANDSCAPES, AND COLOR. ALL TAKEN OUTSIDE WITH MY SAMSUNG GS3.

“With hints of pastels, lifted mid-tones and slight overexposure, A1, A2, and A3 embody analog film. Analog / Archetype is the perfect choice for portraits, interiors and food.” – VSCO Cam

A1: Pretty true to color tone, but colors get brighter and more vibrant. Lose details in light areas, but enhances mid and dark tones. 

A2: Cool filter. Lowers contrast and tone. A generally washed out filter, but would be good for moody photos. 

A3: Warm filter, but otherwise similar to A2. Deepens color tone and value for a more saturated image. I like what it does to landscapes. 

“An ideal all-purpose pack, Presets H1, H2 and H3 excel in fashion, lifestyle and still object photography. Subtle pink, yellow and purple hues evoke the best memories of summertime.” – VSCO Cam

H1: Image is very similar to original. Almost no change to exposure or contrast. Adds the slightest rosy hue. 

H2: A warm yellow filter. I like how it treats skin tones and landscapes. It doesn’t mess too much with contrast and so subtle shades are preserved.

H3: Bright and cool filter. I would like to see it on a whole series of travel photos.

“An ideal all-purpose pack, Polychrome Winter excels in fashion, lifestyle, and still object photography. H4, H5, and H6 are understated and cool, delivering dreamlike hues inspired by the winter season.” – VSCO Cam

H4: Very similar to originals. Slightest blue undertones added.  Retains contrast and brightness.

H5: A deep, but crisp cool filter. I was surprised by how many highlight details it retains while being a strong color filter. I would try it on mountain/snowy photos.

H6: Similar to H5 in the strong, cool filter. But produces muddy images. Very low contrast and exposure. I like the brightness of blue it retains, but most other colors are muddy and washed out. Good “theme” filter though. Could easily be a signature.  

“Tailor-made for bright lights and colors, this N Series works well with photographs shot with the flash or direct sunlight. N1, N2, and N3 have a modern and bold aesthetic.” – VSCO Cam

N1: High exposure which blows out highlights. Neutral in color. I like that it retained the warmth in the landscape image. 

N2: If you can be cool and warm at the same time, this is it. Skin tones get a cool yellow wash. Probably not the best as it could lead to looking sickly. I use N2 (with increased exposure) when photographing my black animals. It brings out their features while retaining true colors. 

N3: Warm filter. Pleasantly fades and softens skin tones. Enhances color vibrancy and tone.


UPDATE: I started the tag #vscocamwitheli.
So tag your edits with it because I want to check them out!
I would absolutely LOVE to see what you’ve been photographing!


I regularly use the N filters to enhance dark photos, and I use the A series a lot for simple images. After doing this, I may play around more with the H 4-6 series. I’ve been in a moody image kick lately and they seem perfect.

Head back to the intro to see whats next!

Which are on your short list so far?

PART FOUR: Limited Edition Collection (Part 3)

PART FOUR: Limited Edition Collection (Part 3)

Hey VSCO Cam fanatics!

I know you’ve been eagerly awaiting the next entry of this series! And honestly, this breakdown/review/guide is my favorite monthly thing to work on. So today I bring you the final installment of the 3 piece series “The Limited Collection”.

This is the final part of a three part series covering the Limited Edition Collection of Presets. You can find it in the VSCO Cam in-app store for $7 (marked down from $16 for a limited time), and contains a whopping 38 presets!

Check out the intro and a breakdown of whats to come. This is not sponsored in any way. I use VSCO for all my mobile photo editing, and I think this resource needed to exist on the internet, so I made it. Simple as that.

Now what you’ve come here for, the photos!

Don’t forget the tag #vscocamwitheli! I love checking out the photo’s y’all are putting together!

  THE ORIGINAL IMAGES. ONE FOR SKIN TONE, LANDSCAPES, AND COLOR. ALL TAKEN OUTSIDE WITH MY SAMSUNG GS3.
THE ORIGINAL IMAGES. ONE FOR SKIN TONE, LANDSCAPES, AND COLOR. ALL TAKEN OUTSIDE WITH MY SAMSUNG GS3.

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B1-3

B1: A little enhanced exposure. Pretty true to tone and saturation. A very mild black and white filter. Doesn’t add too much personality, and I really appreciate it.

B2: A little lighter than B1. More washed about and faded with nothing a true black. But not over done, and I enjoy its simplicity.

B3: Almost no added exposure, Even more true to tone and color. Rounds out a pack of 3 very basic, and dependable black and white filters. 

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B4-6

B4: Focus on contrast and saturation. You will lose details in the dark shaded areas, but it creates a striking image. Does retail details in the lighter values though.

B5: Even more contrast. Dark areas are very dark. Light areas still have details and subtle tint variations.

B6: Very high contrast. You start to regain some dark area details, but light area details are lost and faded out. Not the greatest for subtle skin changes, but would make a fantastic filter for urban imagery.

Overall: The B Series is a group of well rounded, very neutral gray filters. They don’t impart too much personality, just make sure you have a good composition to work with. 

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X1-3

X1: Washes out imagery, and has no true black shades. Highlights and shadows both become more muddy, while losing details. It has a nice fade to it, but I wouldn’t recommend it for images with people.

X2: An even more washed out version of F1. But this time it retains highlight details. Skin tones are more even and palatable. An enjoyable fade, without too much personality.

X3: Similar to X1, but an even higher contrast. Not good to faces or skintones where you need detail. Makes images very black OR white, without much gray tones. Would be fantastic for a very graphically interesting photo.

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X4-6

X4: The first “warm” black and white filter. Retails details very well. And other then being warm, the tones seem to be fairly accurate. I think its similar to old black and white photography that had a warmer hue to the images.

X5: Only slightly warm, better contrast and exposure values than X4. Lets the images stand alone, doesn’t try to make it any better or worse. A pretty true black and white interpretation. Needs strong imagery.

X6: The only very “cool” filter. But pretty accurate detail retention and shading. Contrast is a little improved to creating interesting edges between light and dark, but if the image is pretty well rounded, so is this filter. I’m a impressed by how adaptable it is. 

Overall: The X Series enhances photos. 1-3 makes them very graphically interesting and is probably better for images with strong contrast, or where subtly isn’t important. 4-6 have the most personality, but a mild when it comes to contrast. 


UPDATE: Tag your edits with #vscocamwitheli.
Because I want to check them out!
I would absolutely LOVE to see what you’ve been photographing!


I used to think I hated black & white filters, but after these, I know I’ll be adding them to my editing arsenal. 

Next time, I’ll be covering the Contemporary Collection. It can be found in the VSCO Cam in-app store and includes 12 presets!

Head back to the intro, or if you missed the first two parts of the Limited Collection: PART ONE & PART TWO.

PART THREE: Limited Edition Collection (Part 2)

PART THREE: Limited Edition Collection (Part 2)

Hello mobile editing aficionados!

BEWARE: Today we bring you a pretty long & image heavy post. It’s going to cover the Series: M (Moody), P (Instant), and S (Bright). 

This is part two of a three part series covering the Limited Edition Collection of Presets. You can find it in the VSCO Cam in-app store for $7 (marked down from $16 for a limited time), and contains a whopping 38 presets!

Check out the intro and a breakdown of whats to come. This is not sponsored in any way. I use VSCO for all my mobile photo editing, and I think this resource needed to exist on the internet, so I made it. Simple as that.

If you’ve got any questions, leave them in the comments, or tweet at us.

Oh, and if you missed it, here’s the first part of the Limited Collection.

On to the photos!

Don’t forget to use the #vscocamwitheli tag with your edits! 

 The Original Images. One for Skin Tone, Landscapes, and Color. All taken outside with my Samsung GS3.
The Original Images. One for Skin Tone, Landscapes, and Color. All taken outside with my Samsung GS3.

ABOVE: M1, M2, and M3. The Moody Underexposed Series.

M1: Applys a warm yellow to skin tones and greenery. Doesn’t really enhance exposure or contrast. Could be good to apply a happy mood to a sunny day picture.

M2: Still a yellow filter, but neutral in temperature. Slightly enhances exposure. I wouldn’t recommend it for skin tones, but could be fun in landscapes or abstract shots. 

M3: A cool yellow filter. I can see it being great on beach photos. Makes skin look sickly. Doesn’t wash out or lose details too much either. 

ABOVE: M4, M5, and M6. The Mood Warm Fade Series. 

M4: Rosy undertones. Brightens. Keeps skin tones pretty true. Probably good for pictures with short fields of depth.

M5: Washes out, but probably one of my favorite washouts. It retains most details from original picture. Adds a warm gray wash. Looks faded, and would be good for creating an moody scene.

M6: Brightens and reduces contrast, but is more true to color. Very very faint red tone. Flattens landscapes too much for my taste, but it’s good to skin tones.

ABOVE: P1, P2, and P3. The Instant & Warm Series. 

All of these are very strong. The Instant Series, to me, has too much personality. 

P1: An overall warm filter, the least pure yellow of the 3. Another good sunny day attitude filter. 

P2: Crank up the yellow and crank up the exposure / contrast! Probably good for recreating old Polaroids, which is what I think this entire series is trying to accomplish 

P3: Equally as yellow as 2, doesn’t over expose the picture. Keeps dark colors nice and rich. 

ABOVE: P4, P5, and P6. The Instant & Cool Series. 

All three of these are practically the opposite of their P1-3 counterparts. 

P4:  This is a very icy blue filter that brightens and washes out a little bit. 

P5: A warmer blue filter. Maintains nice dark blacks, but sacrifices the mid-tones. 

P6: A yellow blue filter. Maintains shade range, i.e. highlights and shadows. Brightens slightly. Not great for skintones. 

ABOVE: P7, P8, and P9. The Instant & Classic Series.

If I had to pick a favorite set of the P series it would be this one.

P7: Fades out and applies a warm yet gray/moody haze. Good for urban photography.

P8: One of my favorites. I like rosy filters for putting on happy selfies or snapshots. Skintones glow, while white becomes light pink. 

P9: Another yellow! I really don’t love yellow filters, but for some landscape photography or when people aren’t the subject matter, it adds a very interesting glow and depth to pictures. 

ABOVE: S1, S2, and S3. The Bright & Clean Series.

After the over-doneness of the P series, I’m glad to end on this bright and clean, palette cleansing series!

S1: Enhances the brightness & brings out the warmness in landscape images. Overall very true to color and is very mild.  

S2: A cooler, brighter version of S1. Makes landscapes so bright and clear (go figure)!

S3: A yellower, softer version of S2. Gah, I love clean, photo enhancing, filters! This one is probably my fave of these 3. 

ABOVE: S4, S5, and S6. The Bright & Warm Series. 

S4: Washes out and loses some mid-range definition. Probably good for low light outdoor photos. 

S5: A very red toned filter. I think it adds a nice appealing warmth and mood to landscape photos, but it distorts skin color too much for my taste. 

S6: I think this one is a scaled back version of S5. Much milder with a pleasant air about the images. Brings out nice details in the mid-range. 


UPDATE: I started the tag #vscocamwitheli.
So tag your edits with it because I want to check them out!
I would absolutely LOVE to see what you’ve been photographing!


Phew! Done! This was the longest post of the entire series! There is just too much good stuff in the Limited Collection!

Head back to the intro, or continue on to Part 4: The Limited Edition Collection, where we cover all the black and white presets!

Do you have a favorite so far?

PART TWO: Limited Edition Collection (Part 1)

PART TWO: Limited Edition Collection (Part 1)

Hello photo editors!

I know you’ve been eagerly awaiting the next entry of this series! So today I bring you the second installment, which is also part 1 of a 3 piece series. Yeah, no, that’s not confusing at all. 

This is the first part of a three part series covering the Limited Edition Collection of Presets. You can find it in the VSCO Cam in-app store for $7 (marked down from $16 for a limited time), and contains a whopping 38 presets!

Check out the intro and a breakdown of whats to come. This is not sponsored in any way. I use VSCO for all my mobile photo editing, and I think this resource needed to exist on the internet, so I made it. Simple as that.

UPDATE: In the recent VSCO cam update, they added a feature that not only syncs your photos across multiple devices, but also your presets! Which is awesome! I thought I was going to have to buy them all over again on my iPad app but nay!! So I’m pretty happy cause that too.

On to the photos!

And don’t forget to tag your edits #vscocamwitheli so I can check them out!

 These are the unedited photos. one for skin tone, one for outdoor/landscape and one for color. all taken outside in neutral lighting, with my Galaxy S3.
These are the unedited photos. one for skin tone, one for outdoor/landscape and one for color. all taken outside in neutral lighting, with my Galaxy S3.

ABOVE: C1, C2, and C3. The Vibrant Classic Series. 

C1: A warm filter that will have yellow or rosy under tones depending on your display. Brightens, yet retains shadows and contrast. 

C2: Colors stay pretty true. Good for lightening up dark photos. Doesn’t reveal much detail in dark areas though. 

C3: Probably my favorite of the 3. Colors are still rich and vibrant with good brightening and detail retention. Doesn’t over saturate skin tones. Very similar to C2, just not as exposed.

ABOVE: F1, F2, and F3. The Mellow Fade Series. 

F1:  Stays pretty true to color, slightly rosy tint. Smooths skin, while brightening and enhancing contrast. Neutral overall color. Enhances sharpness.

F2: A cooling filter. Brightens and reduces contrast. Colors not as intense. 

F3: Yellow filter. Brightens and lessens contrast. Smooths skin color. Brings out highlights and darkens shadows.

ABOVE: G1, G2, and G3. The Portrait Series. You can see the editing guide from VSCO on this series here

G1: Accentuates skin tone and applies a subtle warmth. Adds vibrancy and slight contrast.

G2: Makes yellow and orange tones pop. Skin tones get extra glow. For colorful photos that are falling flat. Applies extreme warmth.

G3: For portraits with dramatic lighting that could benefit from a bit more vibrancy and tone. Darkens shadows, creamy complexions. Subtle. 

ABOVE: K1, K2, and K3. The Analog Classic Series. 

K1: Warm yellow filter. A bit too much yellow for me, but adds interesting depth to imagery. Makes greens pop. Mutes blues.

K2: Very red/orange filter. Along with general photo enhancements. Ups color saturation.

K3: Blues are bluer while still being a deep, warm overall filter. Doesn’t brighten as much as it enhances contrast and depth. It’s pretty much the only filter I use on the @elimakesthings Instagram because it’s a great “general” enhancer, and adds just enough personality. (On my top 10 list for sure)

ABOVE: T1, T2, and T3. The Faded & Moody Series. (Lives up to the name.)

T1: A cool yellow filter. Washes out image. Colors unsaturated & blacks and whites become grays. 

T2: Pretty neutral, slightly cooling filter. Brightens and washes out subtle details. 

T3: Cool rosy filter. Black become dark pink. Mutes colors in a wash of rose


UPDATE: I started the tag #vscocamwitheli.
So tag your edits with it because I want to check them out!
I would absolutely LOVE to see what you’ve been photographing!


There you have it! The first part in this 3 part series breaking down The Limited Edition Collection. Head back to the intro, or continue on to Part 3: The Limited Edition Collection.

Did you get a chance to play with these?
What’s your favorite preset so far?